The most underrated anime horror movie of the 2000s

Many creepy anime shows were released in the 2000s; the themes of trauma, abuse, murder and mystery are all part of these dark and gruesome titles.

It can be difficult to scare viewers with anime at times, although that hasn’t stopped several classic anime horror films from emerging over the years. From fear of jumping to overtly bizarre elements, horror anime stands out from most horror films in that it tries to penetrate the skin of both foreign and domestic audiences in many ways.

A number of creepy anime games were released in the 2000s, in which themes of trauma, abuse, murder and mystery were part of these dark and gruesome tales. However, alarming as it may be, all of the following anime are classics in some way thanks to their other elements that come together to provide an eerie and immersive experience that teases, taunts, and tickles as much as they scare.

Shadow Star Narutaru

Shadow Star Narutaru

With a cute monster and an equally harmless intro, many viewers might think that Shadow Star Narutaru it’s just a kids show in the same vein as Pok√©mon or Digimons… However, this is far from the case, and what at first seemed quite useful quickly turns into downright traumatic.

Adaptiruya mangu Mohiro Kito, Shadow Star revolves around a young girl named Shiina who is associated with a strange star-like creature she calls Hoshimaru. Others are also associated with similar “dragons”, and soon Shiina discovers that these people and their friends are not as kind as Hoshimaru. The series begins to include dark themes, scenes of violence, abuse and even sexual assault, almost all of which are directed against a young group of characters. The original manga was written by the brain behind an equally twisted mecha anime Bokuranoso those in need of inhuman mental vomiting should look no further than this 12-episode series.

Portrait of Little Cosette

Portrait of Petit Cosett
Portrait of Petit Cosett

The Manga Portrait of Baby Cosette is a 2004 OVA and subsequently received a manga adaptation. It’s about a young man named Airi Kurahashi who works at a local antique store. However, his usual behavior begins to change when he becomes addicted to the depiction of Cossette, the girl in the picture. The girl appears to be trapped in the painting, she has a dark past and begins to control Airy more and more in a particularly convoluted love story.

The series is filled with supernatural gothic horror and art that perfectly captures its eerie tone. The situation is only amplified in terms of violence and bloodshed, turning the series into a beautiful bloodbath.

Monster

Man looks at his hands
Man looks at his hands

Initially “Monster” aired from 2004 to 2005, combining horror, mystery and psychological thrill. The manga adaptation follows Dr. Tenma, a surgeon from the West German region, whose life has changed dramatically after one dark and stormy night. His choice of who gets the surgery has a dramatic effect on his social standing, but things change for the better after a host of mysterious local killings. Nearly ten years later, Tenme will have to face the past and his role in the actions of a ruthless assassin.

The series is getting more and more uncomfortable, sinking deeper and deeper into just how flawed its villain and other characters are. Likewise, a cat-and-mouse plot game keeps the audience on their toes, not knowing how the story will unfold next. The series became relatively popular when it first came out, but unfortunately it has been forgotten over the years.

Boogiepop never laughs

Boogiepop never laughs
Boogiepop never laughs

The last title on the list is an early 2000s TV series. Boogiepop Phantom. This 12-episode production of Mad House adapted a series of successful light novels. It includes a horrific streak of murders that take place after a huge column of light appears in the sky, with all of the cast members acting as witnesses. Most of them are high school students, many of whom begin to disappear one by one when they blame the mythical Boogie Pop, a figure personifying death itself.

The show puts a lot of emphasis on memory and perception, with some scenes shown twice to highlight them and see them happening from different angles. Dramatic scenes are accentuated by symbolic music, and psychological trauma abounds. Color also plays into symbolism, making this murderous mystery even darker by the time it reaches its conclusion.

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